Today’s word – Acts 1

It’s difficult to not by a cynic. Today you’ll view numerous stories whose headlines serve only one purpse – to get you to click on that link or watch the story. As those headlines are overly-sensationalized for that purpose, you become less likely to believe the next one.

The early verses of Acts 1 contain an event that would’ve been such a headline: Now-alive crucified teacher ascends out of sight, witnesses claim. It would make you pause, right? You’d have to click on the link.

And you’d wonder if that story could really be so.

Our faith asks us to believe some wild things. On the other hand, not believing poses similar challenges.

• It asks us to accept there is no rhyme or reason for our existence other than random molecules smashing into each other.
• It asks us to believe that every decision we make doesn’t have a spiritual side, but is simply a series of chemical reactions in our brains combined with outside factors.
• It asks us to acknowledge that helping the weaker is good and noble, but to accept another philosophy that the best thing for a species is for the strong to flourish and the weaker to die off.

Every personal philosophy requires an amount of faith, a perspective from which you determine the parts you don’t quite understand. At Pentecost the early believers’ credited their ability to speak in other languages to God. Onlookers simply said they were drunk. Today, photos of deep space are viewed as proof there is no God by one group, while others see it as evidence of God’s creativity.

Here’s your good news: If anything, the Bible welcomes cynics. The same arguements against its message have been rehashed for hundreds of years yet like clockwork are presented in new wrapping every Christmas and Easter. The Gospel takes it on and changes hearts anyway. Scripture is to be accepted, but that in no way means it’s not to be examined.

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